Posts Tagged ‘William Gale’

Tax Roundup, 3/18/16: The income tax difference between gifts and compensation, illustrated. And: twins!

Friday, March 18th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

Twins! I’m delighted to report that Abby Croll, a Roth & Company Tax Manager, delivered twins yesterday, a boy and a girl. All are well.

 

20160215-1Too darn busy to file? There are many good reasons to stay current on your tax filings. One compelling reason is that failure to file can draw unwanted attention from the IRS. Returns that aren’t there can stand out.

That seems to be how it worked for an entrepreneur in Northwest Iowa, a Ms. Fairchild. An Eighth Circuit panel yesterday upheld her 33-month sentence on tax charges. The court takes us back to the beginning of the investigation (any emphasis is mine):

In 2009, Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Special Agent Daniel Wright opened an investigation on Fairchild and her husband. Agent Wright discovered that Fairchild and her husband had not filed income tax returns since 2004.

With no returns with which to start, Agent Wright did a little digging:

Agent Wright obtained records from Fairchild’s two primary bank accounts dating back to January 1, 2005. These bank records showed that a number of large cashier’s checks had been deposited into her accounts. Specifically, there were 37 deposits of checks from David Karlen totaling $1,103,647.84. Fairchild’s accounts reflected another six checks totaling $50,000 from Paul Pietz deposited into two main accounts in 2008. The bank records also showed $210,348.39 in total cash deposits from 2005 to 2008.

That was enough to pique Agent Wright’s interest. Meanwhile, Ms. Fairchild wasn’t exactly ignoring her tax issues:

In July 2010, Fairchild and her husband filed joint income tax returns for 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008, apparently unaware of the ongoing IRS investigation. Fairchild, a professional adult entertainer, reported income in each of the respective years as $122,345; $120,000; $120,000; and $151,325. The total income reported of $513,670 was far less than the $1,153,647.84 that Fairchild received from Karlen and Pietz during that same time span. Additionally, the returns did not identify any of Fairchild’s cash deposits during those years as income.

Perhaps a false move, considering that Agent Wright already knew about the deposits. Before long the IRS got copies of these returns to him, and he arranged a chat with Ms. Fairchild:

Agent Wright interviewed Fairchild about her tax returns on July 13, 2011. During that interview, Fairchild explained “that she actually thought all of the money, that every single cashier’s check she received from Mr. Karlen was a gift, but that she had reported some of it to take some of the tax burden off of him.

Very thoughtful.

To determine how much income to claim, Fairchild told Agent Wright that she “ballparked” the amount. In the same interview, Fairchild also claimed that the money from Pietz was a gift and that he had told her that he reported the gift on his income tax return. Even though $30,000 of the money from Pietz was included as income on her 2008 income tax return, Fairchild maintained that it was really a gift that her accountant had mistakenly included as income.

I suppose most people don’t know that gifts don’t show up on income tax returns. Still, one may doubt that gift tax returns were filed for any of these amounts under the circumstances.

In order for a payment to be considered a “gift,” and therefore exempt from income tax, it has to be paid out of “disinterested generosity.” It appears that the benefactors had, um, interests:

According to Karlen, he met Fairchild in 2003 or 2004 while she was dancing. He tipped her money when she danced on stage and paid for private dances inside the club in a private room. Fairchild gave her phone number to Karlen and would call him to tell him when and where she would be dancing. In 2005, Karlen went to watch Fairchild dance at a club; while there, Fairchild asked Karlen if he was interested in paying for sex with her outside of the club. Karlen testified concerning the first time that he met with Fairchild for a “private meeting outside the club.”

You can read the opinion if you care for more details, but they can be condensed into this:

When asked how he “treat[ed] the money that [he] gave to [Fairchild],” Karlen replied, “[f]or her service. . . . For sex.” When asked whether the 37 payments were all for sexual services, Karlen replied, “[e]very one of those.” He later confirmed that “[t]he whole $1.1 million was for sex” and that “[e]verything was for sex.”

Generous, maybe, but not disinterested. It appears that her other benefactor had similar interests.

Ms. Fairchild had an explanation for her late filing:

Fairchild admitted that she did not file income tax returns for 2005 through 2008 until 2010, but she claimed that the delay was due to problems that she experienced during the construction of her new home.

Probably not “reasonable cause,” to IRS thinking. In fairness, it seems she was busy on other things.

20150813-1Now let’s move on to her visit with her tax preparer:

In May 2006, after filing requests with the IRS to file the income tax returns late, [preparer] Anderson met with Fairchild to determine her income. Because Fairchild had no other documentation of her income, she reviewed her bank statements with Anderson to determine which deposits were income. Anderson testified, “I went through and had Veronica [Fairchild] read off the deposits to me, and I ran a tape on my calculator of the number of deposits that she would tell me.

He ran a tape! There’s no school like the old school.

But old school or new, it was all income as far as the IRS was concerned, and it wasn’t reported. Indictment and conviction followed in due course, and yesterday the appeals court upheld a 33-month prison sentence for the underreporting. It perhaps didn’t help that while she didn’t report all of the deposits as income on her 1040, she did report it all to several banks when she applied for loans.

The moral? There are several lessons we can draw. First, file timely. She might have never attracted Agent Wright’s attentions had she filed, unless he was a strip club patron.

Next, beware the tendency to believe what you want to believe about taxable income. Just because the nice man gives you money doesn’t mean he’s doing it because he’s a nice man.

Finally, level with your preparer. The court seems to have held it against her that she didn’t.

Cite: Fairchild, CA-8, No. 14-3517

Prior coverage here.

 

KCRG.com, Iowa Businesses Spend Billions In Tax Coupling

Specifically, agriculture businesses and farms use it for high cost equipment. In 2012 through 2014, agriculture applied that tax law to around 38 percent of their investments. More than twice of any other industry.

In terms of dollars, across all small businesses in Iowa, that’s about $2.7 billion in 2012, $2.7 billion in 2013, and $2.2 billion in 2014. Of that, farm returns claimed between 54 and 66 percent over those three years.

Those numbers come from a white paper by Roger McEowen, a professor of Ag Law at Washburn University and the Midwest Tax Director of CliftonLarsonAllen in West Des Moines.

But what good is it if it never lets a politician issue an economic development press release?

 

The Critical Question: How High Are Beer Taxes in Your State? (Scott Drenkard, Tax Policy Blog). This high:

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Peter Reilly, IRS And Liquor By The Wink. Wherein a glorified bar isn’t a tax-exempt social club.

TaxGrrrl, You Can Thank Excise Taxes For Guinness Stout. That wouldn’t have occurred to me.

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: College Savings Iowa. “It’s a type of529 Plan, where money going into the plan is not tax deductible (for federal taxes) but money coming out not taxed as long as it’s used for qualifying expenses.” And it has an Iowa tax benefit.

Robert Wood, Confusing Personal With Business On Your Taxes Can Mean IRS Penalties Or Jail. Expecially when “confusing” means “pretending.”

Kay Bell, Alexander Hamilton will remain on redesigned $10 bill. Phew.

 

Picture by Dan Kristan

Picture by Dan Kristan

 

William Gale, Taxes on the Rich May Change a Lot in 2017 (TaxVox)

Alex Durante, The U.S. Tax and Transfer System is Very Progressive, New Paper Confirms (Tax Policy Blog). But it is also whimsical: “However, due to the complex system of phase outs of certain tax credits and government transfers, poor households may face marginal tax rates as high as some middle and upper-income households.

All points bulletin! Beware the Slayer of Tax Reform Fantasy (Robert Goulder, Tax Analysts Blog).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1044

Stuart Gibson, Two Steps Forward, Three Steps Back for Europe? (Tax Analysts Blog) “Unfortunately, every time it looks like Europe will unify behind certain tax policies, the member states start circling the wagons and shooting inward.”

News from the Profession. Cyber Extortion: Leprechauns vs. Accountants (Megan Lewczyk, Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 11/20/15: IRS issues workaround for absurdly complex “repair regs.” And: more good ACA news!

Friday, November 20th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

See update below. 

IMG_1218In a tacit admission that the new repair regs are nightmarishly complex, the IRS has issued a new “safe-harbor” procedure for allocating remodeling costs for restraurants and retail buildings between deductible repair costs and capitalized improvement costs.

Rev. Proc 2015-56 is available to most retail buildings and to restaurants.

(UPDATE: Brian Coddington notes correctly in the comments that this procedure only applies to taxpayers with an “applicable financial statement.” These are SEC statements, audited financial statements, or statements supplied to regulators other than the IRS. This seemingly gratuitous requirement greatly reduces the potential usefulness of this procedure. Why the IRS would restrict simplification to just those taxpayers least likely to need it is beyond me. I missed the applicable financial statement requirement in my initial take on the rule. My apologies, and my thanks to Brian for correcting me. Brian’s comment goes beyond this issue and is worth reading in full.)

It excludes vehicle dealers, gas stations, manufactured home dealers and “nonstore retailers.” It applies to business that own their own buildings and to landlords whose buildings hold qualifying businesses.

Under the procedure, 75% of “qualified remodel-refresh costs” are deductible, with the remaining 25% capitalized. The amount capitalized is depreciated over the life otherwise applied to the building. That generally means a 39-year life, but if the building is “qualified restaurant property” or “qualified retail improvement property,” the life can be as short as 15 years.

At first glance, it seems like a much more useful set of rules than the repair regs we were all fretting about this time last year. The biggest potential downside is that Rev. Proc. 2015-56 requires taxpayers to forego “partial disposition” treatment for buildings covered by the safe harbor. The taxpayer also has to elect “general asset account” depreciation for the building covered by the safe harbor.

The election will be made on Form 3115 as “automatic” accounting method change, as newly-designated automatic change number 222. It is available for years begining on or after January 1, 2014. As automatic changes have to normally be made with a timely-filed return, I don’t think we can change already-filed 2014 filings, but I will be digging into the lengthy procedure, and will amend this as needed as I get to understand it better.

 

The insurance markets aren’t doing what the President told them to do. 

First, Tyler Cowen, Further wounds for Obamacare: “To put it bluntly, I don’t think the mandate part of the bill is working.  These are mostly problems which decay and get worse, not problems which self-correct.”

Next, Megan McArdle, Obamacare Insurers Are Suffering. That Won’t End Well:

What UnitedHealth’s action suggests is that the company is not sure it can make money in this market at any price. Executives seem to be worried about our old enemy, the adverse selection death spiral, where prices go up and healthier customers drop out, which pushes insurers’ costs and customers’ prices up further, until all you’ve got is a handful of very sick people and a huge number of very expensive claims.

She adds:

This was part of a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad news cycle for Obamacare; as ProPublica journalist Charles Ornstein said on Twitter, “Not since 2013 have I seen such a disastrous stream of bad news headlines for Obamacare in one 24-hour stretch.” Stories included not just UnitedHealth’s dire warnings, but also updates in the ongoing saga of higher premiums, higher deductibles and smaller provider networks that have been coming out since open enrollment began.

I remember when we were told that the ACA would just get more popular over time as we all grew to love its benefits.

 

No, but they do make it easier to jack up tuition and administrative salaries. $23 Billion In Annual Federal Tax Credits For Higher Education Have No Effect On College Attendance (TaxProf). 

 

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Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Quiet Changes to Social Security Could Have Big Impact (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog):

The file and suspend option was and still is used by couples when one spouse, typically the higher earner, files for benefits but then suspends receiving his or her own benefits. This allows the other spouse to file and receive spousal benefits based on the higher earning spouse’s record for a certain number of years while the higher earning spouse delays benefits and earns delayed retirement credits. The result is larger benefits for the higher-earning spouse at age 70, but still allowing the lower-earning spouse to take benefits. This option has been eliminated — though there may still be time to file and suspend in the next 180 days and be grandfathered in for those who are currently eligible to do so.

Jana expects additional guidance soon.

 

Gretchen Tegeler, Many Iowa public employees are better off in retirement than working (IowaBiz.com). In some cases, we’re better off that they’re retired too.

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2015: #7: Decoding The Mortgage Interest Limitation, “Cohabitation, of course, is not limited to same-sex couples, and so the Ninth Circuit’s decision to allow each taxpayer who co-owns a house to claim an interest deduction on the full $1,100,000 of debt — provided they are not married filing separately — should be a welcome one for many.”

Russ Fox, Update on the Future of Daily Fantasy Sports:

I still think we will end up with a dichotomy within the states. States that are notoriously anti-gambling or have constitutional provisions against gambling (including much of the South: Texas, Florida, and Tennessee; Utah, and Hawaii) will ban DFS, either by Attorney General rulings or by court actions. Other states will regulate DFS. Some states will order the DFS companies to shut down until regulations are in place. A very small number of states will just ignore the issue, and leave DFS in an unregulated state.

A very small number of states realize that fantasy sports aren’t one of the major problems plaguing the republic.

TaxGrrrl, ‘Real Housewives’ Stars Joe & Teresa Giudice Hit With Federal Tax Lien

Robert Wood, More Banks Spill Tax Evasion Secrets To Avoid Criminal Charges, Account Holders Beware. Bank secrecy is pining for the fjords.

 

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Stephen J. Entin, Michael Schuyler, Some Tax Trip-Ups in the Democratic Debate (Tax Policy Blog):

Senator Sanders was asked how high he would raise the top tax rate. He answered, jokingly, that he would boost it a lot, although perhaps not to the 90% top tax rate in the Eisenhower Administration; that he, the Senator, was not as much of a socialist as Eisenhower!  In fact, the top tax rate was 91%…

One result of Ike’s policies was that he presided over three recessions in his eight years in office. Presumably, the Senator would not want to repeat that outcome.

I think Bernie would be willing to take that price to stick it to the man.

William Gale, David John, Two Important New Retirement Savings Initiatives from the Obama Administration (TaxVox) These guys think the MyRA program is important.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 925

 

Peter Reilly, Princeton University Will Have To Prove It Deserves Property Tax Exemption. I’d make them apologize for Woodrow Wilson first.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/16/15: Corporation returns are due today! And: IRS plays a cruel joke on 2011 non-filers.

Monday, March 16th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20130415-1It’s March 16. That means calendar-year corporation and S corporation returns are due today. Failure to file on time can be expensive. If you are filing or extending today, protect yourself by e-filing. If you must paper file, use Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested, to document timely filing. If you can’t get to the post office before it closes, you can go to the FedEx or UPS stores, but make sure you use the right Authorized Private Delivery Service and send it to the proper service center street address, as private services can’t deliver to the service center post office box addresses.

 

Flickr image courtesy Sean MacEntee under Creative Commons license

Flickr image courtesy Sean MacEntee under Creative Commons license

Hah! Fooled you! The IRS last week issued a press release: IRS Has Refunds Totaling $1 Billion for People Who Have Not Filed a 2011 Federal Income Tax Return.

If you haven’t filed your 2011 return yet and you want to claim your refund, you’re in for a nasty surprise: you’re probably already too late.

Section 6511 of the Internal Revenue Code (NOT the “IRS Code.” Stop that!) says (my emphasis):

Claim for credit or refund of an overpayment of any tax imposed by this title in respect of which tax the taxpayer is required to file a return shall be filed by the taxpayer within 3 years from the time the return was filed or 2 years from the time the tax was paid, whichever of such periods expires the later, or if no return was filed by the taxpayer, within 2 years from the time the tax was paid. 

That means for most nonfilers, it’s too late to get that 2011 refund, and it’s 2012 refunds that expire on April 15.

Don’t believe me? Then believe Robert Wood

If you pay estimated taxes or have tax withholding on your paycheck but fail to file a return, you generally have only two years (not three) to try to get it back.  Suppose you make tax payments (by withholding or estimated tax payments) but haven’t filed tax returns (shame on you!) for three or four years? When you file those long-past-due returns, overpayments in one year may not offset underpayments in another.

This is why it is an awful idea to fall behind on filing. If you have a refund coming, it dies in two years, but if you owe and don’t file, the statute of limitations never starts, and the IRS can come after you anytime. If you have refunds coming for some years, but owe on others, you don’t get to offset the expired refunds against the amounts you owe. Heads they win, tails you lose.

I wonder if they do high-fives at the IRS Service Centers when people file their 2011 returns looking to cash in on that $1 billion.

Related: Kay Bell, April 15, 2015, is deadline for unclaimed 2011 tax refunds

 

You mean that wasn’t a guitar mass at 2 a.m.? Tax Exempt Church Turns Out To Be A Night Club (Robert Wood).

 

W2TaxGrrrl, Understanding Your Forms: W-2, Wage & Tax Statement

Kristine Tidgren, Proving That Loan Was a Gift Requires Evidence (ISU-CALT). If it’s documented as a loan and the “lender” dies, it will be hard to convince the heirs that you weren’t supposed to pay it back.

Annette Nellen, Busy Season Updates – TPR and ACA. Some practical thoughts on this tax season’s biggest new challenges.

Jason Dinesen, Financing a Small Business, Part 4 of 5: Don’t Spend Money Just to Get Tax Deductions. A disappointing amount of this happens right at year-end.

Jim Maule, Who’s to Blame for Tax Fraud?  “As to the first point, that tax software is not the reason for tax fraud, I agree.”

Russ Fox, Foreign Earned Income Exclusion Gets a Vegas Preparer in Hot Water

Jack Townsend, Sentencing of Ex-Casino Owner, Nevada Businessman and Former NFL Player for Fraudulent Tax Scheme

 

I went to a hockey game yesterday, and a wedding broke out:

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There was a pretty good fight, too. Not involving the couple, I’ll hasten to add.

 

William McBride, Critics of Rubio-Lee Tax Reform Are Way Off the Mark (Tax Policy Blog):

In sum, there are many reasons to think the Rubio-Lee tax plan, or something similar, would have tremendous growth effects. The Tax Foundation’s macroeconomic tax model finds that the plan is indeed extremely pro-growth, while raising the after-tax incomes of families up and down the scale.

While critics may challenge the magnitude of these findings, given the current state of the economy and middle-class wages, this is a serious plan that should spur an honest debate over how best to overhaul our dysfunctional federal tax code.

He addresses doubters like William Gale.

 

Jennifer DePaul, Michigan House Kills Film Tax Credit, Florida Lawmakers Look to Revamp Theirs (Tax Analysts, $link):

Bill sponsor Rep. Dan Lauwers (R) said the film industry has “sapped the state’s budget without creating promised full-time jobs.”

“For every dollar of taxpayer money we have invested into film subsidies, the state has gotten 10 cents in return from that venture,” Lauwers said in a statement. “There are so many more worthwhile uses we can put that money toward.”

It’s good to see a state legislator grasp the concept of opportunity costs. Florida lawmakers apparently didn’t get the memo.

Jared Walczak, Film Tax Credits on the Chopping Block in Massachusetts (Tax Policy Blog)

 

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IJReview, New Tax Scam: That ‘IRS Agent’ Calling and Threatening You For Your Money Is a Fake.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 676The IRS Scandal, Day 675The IRS Scandal, Day 674. This one, quoting Roger Wood, tells you why the IRS will never be trustworthy under its current commissioner:

After the targeting scandal had been underway for over a year, Mr. Koskinen testified that recovery efforts had been thorough, but the tapes and emails just couldn’t be found. As if to goad Republicans, he said that millions in taxpayer money was spent looking. Over 250 IRS employees spent 100,000 hours, costing taxpayers at least $14 million. However, the Treasury Inspector General has revealed that the IT people at the IRS say no one even asked them to recover the emails.

A new commissioner isn’t sufficient to make the IRS trustworthy, but it is necessary.

 

Caleb Newquist, PwC Gave Former Ways & Means Chairman Dave Camp a Job. (Going Concern) It may be tax season, but I suspect he’s not going to be looking at any 1040s.

Peter Reilly, Looks Like No Charitable Deduction For Gifts To Steak And You Know Day. No, not baked potatoes.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/19/14: What to do when capital gain tax is voluntary. And: no signature yet.

Friday, December 19th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Programming note: The Tax Update will be taking a long weekend. Back Wednesday.

The President hasn’t signed the extender bill yet. Everyone says he will sign HR 5771, but a lot of taxpayers will feel better when its official.  You can frantically refresh the Whitehouse.gov “Signed Legislation” page to watch for it.

 

Flickr Image courtesy donjd2 under Creative Commons License.

Flickr Image courtesy donjd2 under Creative Commons License.

So you cashed out some stock market gains this year. That makes it a good year to cash out your losers too. Capital losses can be deducted on individual returns to the extent of capital gains, plus $3,000.  That means if you have some unrealized losses on other investments, paying tax is optional to that extent.

If you don’t want to volunteer to pay those extra capital gain taxes, here are some tips for deducting your investment losses:

The loss has to be realized in a taxable account. Selling a loser in an IRA or 401(k) plan doesn’t give you a deductible loss.

-Be sure the trades are executed no later than December 31. For long positions, the trade date controls.

-If you have a loss on a short sale, the settlement date has to be no later than December 31.

-You can’t buy the same stock within either 30 days before the sale or 30 days afterwards. If you do, the “wash sale” rules disallow your loss. The IRS says this rule applies even if your loss is in a taxable account and your gain is in a non-taxable IRA.

Related: Topic 409 – Capital Gains and Losses (IRS.gov)

 

20120906-1Robert Wood, Ranking Facebook, Boris Johnson, Google On Taxes (Diplomatically Please). Well, Boris Johnson is the only one who doesn’t collect corporate welfare from me via the State of Iowa.

Kay Bell, Good news: the 2015 tax-filing season will start on timeBad news: It will be pretty miserable for IRS and taxpayers. Whee.

Jack Townsend, The Rub Between Restitution Assessed as a Tax and a Deficiency

Jim Maule, Code Size Claim Shrinks But Not Enough. The code is bad enough. There’s no need to exaggerate.

Peter Reilly, First Circuit Loss For Transgender Prisoner May Have Positive Tax Implications For Others. Peter can find tax implications in places I wouldn’t have thought to look.

Robert D. Flach gets us Buzzing into the big holiday week.

 

20120702-2Kristopher Hauswirth has been pondering the Farm Bill:

Commodity producers with the resources and/or level of sophistication to confidently optimize their farm bill decisions least need the safety net. While the smallest and/or least sophisticated producers will have to stumble into positive outcomes, if they benefit at all.

The greatest beneficiaries of this law are the people who have serve no public interest in benefitting from a program of this nature. They are the people and entities that create the system, unlock the riddle, and administer the program: lobbyists, lawmakers, attorneys, accountants, and government agencies.

So it’s pretty much like the tax law, then.

 

William McBride, New Research Shows Multinational Corporations Have No Tax Advantage Over Domestics (Tax Policy Blog). “The study calls into question policy makers’ emphasis on international “profit shifting,” including the elaborate efforts by the OECD and rich-country governments to crack down on MNCs exclusively.”

William Gale, Magical Thinking on Tax Reform (TaxVox). “Tax reform is important but policy makers and the public should not be misled about its true trade-offs. Unfortunately, the benefits of reform are more modest than its backers sometimes claim and its costs are often higher.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 589

 

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Clint Stretch, Did Next Year’s Holiday Gift Shopping Just Get Easier? (Tax Analysts Blog). “President Obama’s move to normalize relations with Cuba may add Cuban cigars and Cuban rum to next year’s holiday gift possibilities.”

Sebastian Johnson, What to Buy the Discerning Policy Wonk in Your Life: The ITEP/CTJ Holiday Gift-Giving Guide. The Tax Shelter Coloring Book!

Career Corner. Be Social, Don’t Skip the Party, and Other Redundant Holiday Party Advice (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). “Now, let’s talk about alcohol. Just because you can get blitzed on Fireball shots doesn’t mean you should.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/6/14: You pretend to complete the form, we’ll pretend to care. And: election mania!

Thursday, November 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitorsthe godawful link you seek is here.

 

20120905-1Don’t worry about getting it right, just make it look good. IRS personnel trying to appease angry practitioners at an AICPA Tax Division gathering had some strange and annoying things to say yesterday.

Practitioners are upset at the IRS insistence on Form 3115 accounting method change applications with 2014 returns from everyone moving into compliance with the new rules on repair and capitalization costs.  Tax Analysts reports ($link):

Participants in the tax methods and periods panel at the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants fall Tax Division meeting in Washington said that some taxpayers don’t want to pay the high costs associated with going through years’ worth of records to calculate a precise section 481(a) adjustment required under the final regulations (T.D. 9636). The cost of that level of compliance could be more than the entire cost of preparing their returns, practitioners said, adding that the taxpayers are considering filing their method changes with corresponding section 481(a) adjustments of zero.

The piece cites Scott Dinwiddie, special counsel, IRS Office of Associate Chief Counsel (Income Tax and Accounting):

Taxpayers were taking aggressive positions, so the government didn’t want to provide an across-the-board cutoff in the final regulations, he said. Instead, it required 481(a) adjustments as a way to allow field agents to examine taxpayers’ aggressive positions, he said.

So because some taxpayers were taking positions you didn’t like, you want to require everyone to do a bunch of wasteful and meaningless busy work during our busiest time of the year. Got it.

Dinwiddie said that, barring a situation in which the taxpayer has taken aggressive positions in the past or has in no way applied a proper capitalization method, the IRS is unlikely to have much interest in examining a taxpayer’s section 481(a) adjustment now.

So we pretend to file an accurate Form 3115, and they pretend to care. Well, you have to admit that considering the budget and enforcement restraints on the IRS, this approach is… absolutely insane. Taxpayers have to pay for a bunch of nonsense compliance, and the IRS doesn’t care whether it’s right. The IRS still has to incur processing costs. I’d love to see the IRS cost-benefit worksheets on this one.

 

20120810-1The TaxProf has a roundup of observations on the whether tax reform can happen in the new Congress, including this from William Gale:

It is a good bet that the new Republican Congress will continue to talk about tax reform. That is safe ground for Republicans generally. And, of course, seemingly impossible things do sometimes happen. But I wouldn’t bet on tax reform. 

A wise non-bet.

 

TaxGrrrl, What Matters Most When It Comes To Tax Reform? Hint: It’s Not Control Of Congress:

What is interesting, however, is that most of the significant tax policy changes in the modern era are more closely tied to the length of presidential terms. Every president has a budget – and an agenda – but real shifts in rates and policies tend to happen during a second term (or en route to a second term) no matter which party is in control. 

I don’t expect it to happen this time.

 

Scott Drenkard, What Do the 2014 Midterm Election Results Mean for State Tax Policy? “My prediction is that this means that taxes will be one of the biggest, if not the biggest issue in state policy next legislative session, and that tax reform will become even more of a bipartisan issue.”  I’m afraid that’s not true here in Iowa.

Russ Fox, Nevada Goes Deep Red. “Do you remember 1928? Well, that was the last time Nevada had a Republican governor, a Republican State Assembly, a Republican State Senate, and Republicans holding all major statewide offices.”

Paul Neiffer, A Christmas Present?! “They will meet over the next six weeks or so and around Christmas time we will get the final tax package.”

 

 

20120702-2Arnold Kling’s characteristically wise observation on the election results:

Conventional wisdom is that, relatively speaking, Democrats have a structural advantage in Presidential elections, because those elections attract more turnout. In other words, they do much better among disengaged voters. One could spin this positively for the Democrats, saying that they get support from the weaker segments of society. One could spin this negatively and say that they rely on a segment of the electorate that is poorly informed and easily bamboozled, which I believe is the case. The counter to that would be that Republicans also rely on a segment of the electorate that is poorly informed and easily bamboozled, which I also believe is the case.

While I don’t agree with all of what he says, the whole post is brief and well worth reading. So is this from Don Boudreaux:

I advise freedom-loving and free-market-appreciating Americans (of which I am unashamedly one) to be good Tullockians about the results of yesterday’s landslide wins for the G.O.P.  The Republicans who won those elections are, after all, politicians – and it is the rare politician, of whatever party, who reliably puts principle above personal interest.  As a rule, politicians are untrustworthy, duplicitous, and cowardly; they are people who have an unusually powerful craving for power and fame; and the successful among them typically posses an unusual talent for camouflaging their craving for power and fame as a saintly calling to ‘serve the people.’

Pretty much. But some are less bad than others, enough so that I do bother to vote.

Renu Zaretsky, Don’t Call It a Comeback… Yet.  The TaxVox headline roundup is full of post-election links, including news of Berkeley, California, passing an idiotic soda tax. When they start taxing mocha lattes, I’ll believe they’re such taxes are about public health than moral vanity.

 

20141016-1

And some folks are actually talking about things other than the election:

Jana Luttenegger, Even Startups Need to Have the Conversation (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).

Jason Dinesen tells us A Little Bit About Sole Proprietorships, Part 1

William Perez, Dividends: Taxes and Reporting

Robert D. Flach recounts EXPLAINING MORTGAGE INTEREST AND INVESTMENT INTEREST FOR A CLIENT

Jim Maule discusses how Mortgage Loan Modification Can Imperil Interest Deduction

Stephen Olsen at Procedurally Taxing as a new round of Summary Opinions., with links to news from the world of tax procedure.

Jack Townsend, The Honorable Jed Rakoff on Why Innocent People Plead Guilty. He quotes Judge Rakoff: “…the guidelines, like the mandatory minimums, provide prosecutors with weapons to bludgeon defendants into effectively coerced plea bargains.”

Kay Bell, 5 tax record keeping questions … and answers!

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 546

News from the Profession. McGladrey Reminds Audit Staff to Stay Billable This Busy Season (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/22/14: Lerner speaks, sort of. And: a federal tax amnesty?

Monday, September 22nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner gives an interview. The former IRS officer at the center of the Tea Party disclosure scandal won’t testify under oath, but she sat down for a two-hour interview with Politico: Exclusive: Lois Lerner Breaks Silence:

And she’s a savvy lawyer: She studiously avoided answering fundamental questions about her role in the IRS scandal that could land her in deeper trouble with Congress. During her POLITICO interview, flanked by her husband, a partner at a national law firm, and two of her personal attorneys, she opened up about her life as a pariah, joked about horrible news photos and advice that she disguise herself with a blond wig, and cried when expressing gratitude for her legal team’s friendship.

It is, of course, a public-relations play, designed to make her look like a misunderstood victim of a partisan witch hunt. But it isn’t an especially impressive effort. From the Politico piece:

Several Lerner allies said she was so focused on enforcement that she failed to see the sensitivity of bringing cases against incumbents running for reelection.

But Republicans continue to point to emails in which Lerner inquired about Crossroads specifically, asking her colleagues why the group hadn’t been audited and suggesting the group’s application should be denied. And just weeks before the tea party news broke, after she had seen a draft of the damning inspector general report, she asked colleagues if internal IRS instant messages are tracked and could be requested by Congress.

A little history sheds some light on her “non-partisan” background:

– Before she worked at the IRS, she worked at the Federal Elections Commission, she attempted to get an Illinois GOP senate candidate to withdraw from public life as the price for ending an FEC investigation. The allegations were later dismissed.

– The IRS Commissioner, Doug Shulman, repeatedly denied there was any targeting before the report. Either he knew better, or as a subordinate, she didn’t pass the word up the chain.

– She was in the middle of the Tea Party efforts at an early date. When the Treasury Inspector General Report was about to open the scandal, she did a modified limited hangout, using a planted question to spin the story as just a Cincinnati rogue agent problem.

– She had a hang-up about the Citizens United decision, and her emails show that she was trying to use the tax law to accomplish what the Supreme Court had forbidden.

– The numbers are glaring, showing that conservative groups got much more scrutiny, and it took much longer for their applications to be approved than liberal groups:

targetingstats

Ms. Lerner has, of course, invoked the Fifth Amendment to avoid testifying before Congress about her role in the scandal.

Presumably this interview is the start of a P.R. campaign. I don’t think it will work, but it might get her some good press from outlets inclined to dismiss the scandal.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 500. It features Stonewall Koskinen: The IRS Commissioner Was Supposed to Clean Up the Mess. Instead, He’s Running Interference from Kimberly Strassel of the Wall Street Journal:

 The only thing Mr. Koskinen has seemed remotely interested in turning around is his agency’s ugly story-line. He has yet to even accept his agency did anything wrong, spending a March hearing arguing that the IRS didn’t engage in “targeting” and claiming the Treasury inspector general agreed. This was so misleading the Washington Post gave Mr. Koskinen “three Pinocchios, ” noting the IG had testified to the exact opposite.

He seems intent on de-throning Doug Shulman as the Worst Commissioner Ever.

 

 

get-outRobert D. Flach asks WHAT ABOUT A FEDERAL TAX AMNESTY?

This would be a one-time only offer. The legislation creating the Federal Tax Amnesty Program could so state by forbidding any future Amnesty programs. Or it could state that the federal government would not be able to institute another Amnesty Program during the twenty years after the end of the current amnesty period.

I have my doubts. One Congress can’t bind another, and if it is popular, the pressure for another amnesty will start building as soon as the first one ends. I also worry about the chump effect – people will feel like chumps for complying, and will convince themselves that if they don’t comply, there will be another amnesty anyway. But I might be convinced otherwise, especially if it were combined with tax reforms that would help prevent the need for another one.

 

Russ Fox, “I’ve tried to tell you the truth every time I’ve been here”. “That quote is from IRS Commissioner John Koskinen during his testimony from earlier this week on Capitol Hill. I have a simple question for Commissioner Koskinen: Why doesn’t that quote read, ‘I’ve told you the truth every time I’ve been here?'”

TaxGrrrl, Back To School 2014: Childcare Expenses

Jack Townsend, Trial Management of the Cheek Good Faith Defense.  Or as an old lawyer I know calls it, the “good-faith fraud defense.”

Kay Bell, Getting old sucks. We can’t stop Father Time, but we can prepare physically, emotionally and financially. And it still beats the alternative.

 

David Brunori talks about Nevada’s Tesla giveaway in State Tax Notes ($link):

Nevada is giving $1.3 billion to a company that is essentially owned by a guy worth $12 billion. I don’t begrudge Elon Musk his money. On the contrary, I admire his ability to create and accumulate great wealth. I just don’t see the need to give him public money. Assuming you ascribe to the belief that horizontal equity requires that similarly situated taxpayers bear similar burdens, Nevada is giving away public money…

I know that the politics of incentives are impossible to overcome. And I have had numerous readers tell me to give my constant ranting a rest. But the political inevitability of tax incentives does not make them appropriate or good.

Tax credit corporate welfare doesn’t just hurt the states that “lose” the competition to bribe companies like Tesla. It hurts all of the businesses of the “winning” state that have to pay full-freight while brazen and well-connected companies like Tesla pay nothing.

 

20140922-1William Gale, Income Tax Changes and Economic Growth (TaxVox) “While there is no doubt that tax policy influences economic choices, it is by no means obvious on an ex ante basis that tax rate cuts will ultimately lead to a larger economy.”

Joshua McCaherty,  Senator Schumer’s Retroactive Tax Bill (Tax Policy Blog). Part of the inversion diversion.

Ajay Gupta, Renouncing the Dogma of Surrey’s Infallibility (Tax Analysts Blog). Sounds like something involving the Pope and Henry VIII, but it’s really about transfer pricing.

A new Cavalcade of Risk is up at Workers Comp Resource Center, with posts from around the insurance and risk-management world.

 

News from the Profession. 15 Reasons Why EY’s BuzzFeed Post Is a Bunch of Malarkey (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/3/14: Fight the power edition. And: another Iowa film credit economic triumph!

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

It’s good to be back.  Sometimes other things take precedence over work.

 

Fight the Power!  Tax Analysts’ Joseph Thorndike defends the corporation income tax as a bulwark against corporate power ($link):

Popular fondness for taxing corporations may reflect an imperfect understanding of the corporate levy’s incidence. But it also reflects a clear-headed view of where the power lies in American society.

That’s interesting.  Lets see where some major institutions stack up in terms of “power,” measured by revenue (an imperfect measure, but one that is at least available for all of them, unlike net worth).

Google: $55 billion.

Apple: $171 billion.

Microsoft: $23 billion.

BP: $379 billion

State of California: $112 billion

United States Government revenue: $2,770 billion.

United States Government spending: $3,450 billion.

 

In handy graph form:

20140902-1

Of course, only one of these outfits can also send in people with guns to settle disputes with all of the others.  So who is going to impose an income tax to rein in the monster on the Potomac?

 

Economic Development, film style: Iowa pays $2 million to settle film lawsuit (Des Moines Register).  But think of the intangible benefits!

 

Kristy Maitre, Kristine Tidgren, ACA’s Thorny Impact On More-Than-2% S Corporation Shareholders

Consequently, in the absence of further guidance, we believe that if an S corporation chooses to increase wages for its employees to make up for its non-ACA-compliant employer payment plan, the more-than-2% shareholders will now have to pay FICA/FUTA taxes on that compensation, just as the other employees will now have to pay income taxes and FICA taxes on the increased wages. These payments are no longer made pursuant to an employer health plan and cannot be excluded from taxation.

You don’t have to have 50 employees to have Obamacare problems.

 

Peter Reilly, IRS Will Not Tax Forfeited Jackpots Of Compulsive Gamblers.  Mighty kind of them.

Kay Bell, Running errands for mom and other September tax moves

TaxGrrrl, Credit Cards, The IRS, Form 1099-K And The $19,399 Reporting Hole

Tony Nitti, Tax Court Says Bank ‘Thank You’ Points Are Taxable Income   

 

 

Scott Hodge, IRS Data Contradicts Kleinbard’s Warnings of Earnings Stripping from Inversions  (Tax Policy Blog)

Ajay Gupta, Yep, Son, We Have Met the Enemy (Tax Analysts Blog).  Mr. Gupta discusses the FIRPTA precedent for the current inversion hysteria:

It turns out that the enemy in the ‘80s was not the pools of offshore money ready to descend on onshore real estate. Nor will the enemy this time be the many offshore tax havens ready to shelter departing onshore companies. The enemy, as always, is closer to home.

Congress would be a good place to look.

 

Robert D. Flach once again gets to the heart of the matter:  “There is absolutely nothing illegal, immoral, or unethical with trying to ‘dodge’ taxes.  By ‘dodge’ I mean ‘avoid’.”

 

20140527-1Joseph Thorndike, When Do-Gooder Taxes Don’t Do Good (Tax Analysts Blog).

I’m no fan of anti-obesity taxes, whether they target soda, candy bars, or any other junk food. They are regressive and arbitrary, not to mention paternalistic and condescending. Supporters have all sorts of genuine good intentions. But ultimately, these taxes are simply an unfair money grab dressed up as a public health initiative.

Now we have some evidence that they may be ineffective, too.

Imagine that.

 

William Gale, Don’t be fooled: America’s deficit is still a problem

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown: Sept. 2 (Tax Justice Blog).  A left-side rundown of “Oil tax ballot fails in Alaska, film tax credits pass in California, and Ohio needs to do more on EITC expansion. Also: updates on Iowa gubernatorial election and a new report on airline gas tax breaks.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 482

 

And New Coke marketing genius award goes to…  From Going Concern, news of the boldest marketing move since the Edsel.  (Adrienne Gonzalez)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/10/14: Sioux City $afety Edition. And: rogue dentistry!

Monday, March 10th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Sioux City Revenue Camera Windfall.  The Des Moines Register today lists the winners from revenue cameras around the state.  Public safety isn’t up there:

Tickets from automatic traffic cameras totaled $19.7 million for nine Iowa cities during the last fiscal year, but more than 34 percent of that money went to out-of-state vendors.

The summary:

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Sioux City benefitted richly from Iowa’s status as the only state allowing revenue cameras on interstate highways:

Iowa is the only state in the country that allows speed cameras to be permanently placed on highways and interstates. The data collected by the DOT shows those cameras are the most lucrative: The two placed in a construction zone on Interstate Highway 29 in Sioux City brought in more than $4.5 million for the fiscal year ending in June.

gatsoThe evident failure of the cameras to stop construction zone speeding tells you how much they help public safety.  If they stopped speeding, there wouldn’t be so much revenue.  Of course, Sioux City also has a big incentive to generously define “construction zones” and leave them in place after construction is completed.  I drove through the I-29 zone on a Sunday night (no ticket for me!);  with no no workers around at the time, the only point of the construction zone speed limits when I drove through was camera revenue.

Some good news from the piece: “The number of red-light cameras nationally is dropping, according to a study by the Reason Foundation, a libertarian-leaning think tank.”  That’s because they’re a crock, a corrupt bargain between the operators and the municipalities, and people hate that.

 

William Perez, Need Extra Time to Finish up Your 2013 Tax Return?:

The IRS will grant a person an additional six months to file their tax return. To request this extra time, file an extension with the IRS on or before the deadline.

Filing an extension provides several benefits. Besides extra time to file the tax return, an extension also provides extra time to fund a self-employed retirement plan and to recharacterize IRA contributions.

And, contrary to myth, it doesn’t increase your chances of getting audited.  In contrast, filing an erroneous return to beat the deadline or get a quicker refund definitely increases your audit risk.

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): D Is For DRIP   

Kay Bell, Daylight Saving Time + gas taxes = boon for tax collectors, but some money-saving options for added daylight drivers 

Janet Novack, Pensions Create Yet Another Tax Trap For U.S. Expatriates

Russ Fox, False Checks, Trusts, and Ignoring Taxes Lead to Real Prison.  Indeed they do.

 

 Joseph Henchman, State Tax Reforms Are More Than Just Revenue Changes (Tax Policy Blog):

But more to the point, we consider 2013 one of the most successful years for tax reform we’ve seen in a while. We saw North Carolina cut its taxes but, more importantly, massively restructure them to become flatter, simpler, and more competitive. The real improvement in North Carolina wasn’t just the amount of taxes (though they did cut taxes, as noted above), but the structure of the tax code.

Beyond North Carolina’s landmark reform, Indiana under Governor Mike Pence (R) also moved to cut its personal income taxes and abolish its death tax. Wisconsin also made significant income tax cuts accompanied by positive structural changes authored by Representative Dale Kooyenga. Even in states that couldn’t achieve such sweeping reforms, valuable progress was made. Arizona implemented an important simplification of its sales tax code. Governor Martinez of New Mexico worked with her legislature to cut her state’s corporate tax. Texas made some positive reforms to its damaging gross receipts tax, the margin tax.

Notice one state missing there?  Anyone?  Iowa?  The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan is ready to go!  How about a 4% top individual rate, repeal of the Iowa corporation tax, and massive simplification — or do you like massive complexity, special favors for special friends, and the nation’s highest stated corporate rate?

 

Eric Todor, Tax Reform’s Quiet Protectionism (TaxVox): “In effect, income from the sale in the United States of goods manufactured overseas by controlled foreign subsidiaries (CFCs) of U.S.-resident multinational companies would be taxed at a higher U.S. rate than other income from the same factory”

 

William Gale, Alan Auerbach, Forgotten but Not Gone: The Long-Term Fiscal Imbalance (TaxVox):

First, ignoring projections for the future, the current debt-GDP ratio is far higher than at any time in U.S. history except for a brief period around World War II. While there is little mystery why the debt-GDP ratio grew substantially over the last six years – largely the recession and, to a smaller extent, countercyclical measures – today’s higher debt-GDP ratio leaves less “fiscal space” for future policy.

Second, while we clearly face no imminent budget crisis, our new projections suggest the 10-year budget outlook remains tenuous and is worse than it was last year, primarily due to changes in economic projections.

And the rich guy can’t pick up the tab.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

George Will, The IRS’s behavior taxes credulity:

Obama breezily says there was nothing more sinister than “boneheaded decisions” by wayward and anonymous IRS underlings. Certainly boneheadedness explains much about this administration. Still, does he consider it interesting that the consequences of IRS boneheadedness were not randomly distributed but thwarted conservatives?

The rules that Obama says befuddled the IRS boneheads — to his benefit — read today exactly as they have read since 1959. For half a century they did not prevent the IRS from processing applications for tax-exempt status in less than three months. Some conservative group should offer $10,000 to anyone who can identify a liberal group that had the experience scores of conservative groups have had — an application delayed more than three years and receipt of an IRS questionnaire containing at least 60 questions.

Believing that there isn’t a “smidgen of corruption” is about as much of an intellectual leap as, say, believing dinosaurs and humans co-existed.

Via Instapundit

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 305

 

Jack Townsend has a List of 14 Swiss Banks Under Criminal Investigation

Quotable: 

Many smart people think preparers should be regulated. I just don’t agree. There is no market failure. If you don’t like your preparer, find another one. Or better yet, write your representative and ask for a tax system that doesn’t require low-income people to pay preparers.

David Brunori, State Tax Notes ($link)

 

I suspect he won’t need a preparer for awhile now.  From Going Concern:

Xzavier allegedly beat up a tax preparer when he found out the woman he was with wouldn’t be getting her refund in cash. After a security guard intervened, he is accused of whipping out his heat and shooting both the guard and two women. A fourth person was grazed by a bullet but not shot.

I’m sure that really helped her get that refund sooner.

 

Crazy news from Canada: Rogue dentist fined $33,000 for unpaid tax; Tung Sheng Wu practised dentistry illegally in the tri-cities and Burnaby

I’m pretty sure I’ve never seen the phrase “rogue dentist” before.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/5/14: President proposes $1 million Sec. 1031 cap. And: other doomed stuff!

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Economic supergenius

0-99, 0-414

The President trotted out his old petty tax increases in his 2015 budget yesterday, and a few new ones.  The  new taxes would go towards, among other spending increases, an increase in the Earned Income Tax Credit welfare program for childless taxpayers.

If history is a guide, the Obama budget isn’t going to do well in Congress.  His own party leadership in the Senate has already pledged to pass no budget at all.  When his 2013 budget plan came up for a vote in Congress, it was rejected 99 -0 in the Senate and 414-0 in the House.

Still, it is worth mentioning some of the tax proposals, just so you are aware of them and their low likelihood of passage anytime soon.  Also, in light of the recent Camp “tax reform” proposal, apparently no tax provision is too dumb to get bipartisan consideration, so some of these might even pass someday.

– S corporations: the bill would tax as self-employment income 100% of K-1 income from professional S corporations and partnerships of materially-participating owners.  Businesses covered would include health, law, engineering, architecture, accounting, actuarial science, performing arts, consulting, athletics, investment advice or management, brokerage services, and lobbying.  For some reason, regular compensation would no longer be wages, but would instead be self-employment income.  That would wreak havoc on everybody’s 401(k) and profit-sharing plans.

– Like-kind exchange benefits would be capped at $1 million per taxpayer per year.  That won’t be popular with the real estate industry.

The bill also drags out dozens of the old proposals from his prior budgets, including LIFO repeal, ordinary income treatment for carried interests, capping the value of deductions at 28%, and capping build-ups in retirement plans.  Nothing at all is likely to happen before the next election on these proposals, but as many Obama proposals are also included in some form in the GOP Camp plan, they all have to be considered viable next time a major tax bill shows signs of moving.

The TaxProf has a good link-filled roundup.  The official explanation of the revenue-raisers is here.

Other coverage:

Kay Bell, Obama budget proposes more child care help for younger kids

Leslie Book, President’s Budget Proposes Major Procedural and Administrative Changes (Procedurally Taxing).  “The popular media has generally described the plan overall the way Reuters did in reporting that it ‘stands little or no chance of being approved as is by Congress, where Republicans, who control the House of Representatives, disagree with the president’s policy priorities.'”

 

Des Moines Register, Voters OK increasing franchise fee in Des Moines.  The vote is the result of the city being ordered to repay an illegally-collected utility tax:

The money raised by increasing the franchise fee to 7.5 percent from 5 percent for seven years will be used to pay off about $40 million in bonds issued by the city to pay for the refund and administrative costs.

Among the “administrative costs” is $7 million in legal fees Des Moines was ordered to pay to the winning taxpayer attorneys after a scorched-earth court battle by the city to avoid repaying the illegal tax.  Next time, don’t collect an illegal tax, and pay up if you’re called on it.

 

Alan Cole, True Marginal Tax Rates under Chairman Camp’s Proposal (Tax Policy Blog).  Full of high-income phase-outs, it creates all sorts of goofy marginal rate anomalies:

Marginal Tax Rates Camp Tax Reform

Note the spike in rates at the low-end as a result of the earned-income tax credit phase-out.  That doesn’t even include the effect of the state EITCs that piggyback on the federal credit.  All of this is the opposite of tax reform.  Apparently neither party is ready for reform.

William Gale and Donald Marron, The Macro Effects of Camp’s Tax Reform (TaxVox): “How would Camp’s plan increase growth, and why is the range of estimates so wide?”

 

Paul Neiffer, Additional Tax Reform Items.  “Remember, this is just a proposal and nothing will happen this year.”

Gene Steurle, A Camp-ground for Tax Reformers (TaxVox).

 

20130419-1Russ Fox, Deadlines for Us, but Not for Them:

For practitioners, the current state of the IRS is such that you can expect a lot of delays in responding to notices. Think months instead of weeks. Expect to have to call the IRS to verify that your response was received, and make sure clients are aware that the IRS is moving like molasses rolling uphill. Make sure anything you send is documented: certified mail with proof of receipt if by mail; if faxing, make sure you have the proof of receipt. Given the lengthy delays our clients are going to be in fear for far longer…

For taxpayers, you need to be aware that expediency is not part of today’s IRS. You have to be expedient in responding to notices but don’t expect the IRS to be expedient in getting back to you. Do not worry if it takes a long, long time to resolve something with the IRS. That’s just par for the course today.

Unfortunately, clients generally assume that if the IRS has sent a letter, that means the practitioner screwed up.  Many people, especially old folks, just pay up when they get an IRS notice.

 

William Perez, Tax-Deductible Relocation Expenses

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): B Is For Basis   

David Brunori, Taxing Coca Cola while Exempting Broccoli is Bad Policy Even for Native Americans (Tax Analysts Blog):

 In any event, several newspapers reported that one of the sponsors of the proposal was himself obese. He decided to change his life and lost 100 pounds. And he did it without any tax increases or help from the government.

Like so many reformed smokers/overeaters/drinkers, he has become annoying about it.

Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: State Policy Makers Need a Tax History Lesson

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 300.

 

Cheer up!  Filing Your Tax Return Is Terrible — But It Was Worse 100 Years Ago (Joseph Thorndike, Tax Analysts Blog).

News from the Profession.  The Real Loser at the Oscars This Year Was PwC.  (Going Concern)

20140305-1Jason Dinesen shares his Tax Season Tunes:

Here’s a sampling of other tunes I listen to while working when not getting my Gordon Lightfoot fix:

  • Neil Diamond. Generally not his “famous” songs. I detest — and I mean absolutely revile — “Sweet Caroline,” for example. The original recording is okay, but he’s turned it into a hokey, over-the-top, karaoke show-tune over the last few decades. Blech. I like the more introspective songs like “Shilo,” “If You Know What I Mean,” “Stones,” pretty much anything from his relatively new “12 Songs” and “Home Before Dark” albums,  and a host of other Neil Diamond songs that most people have probably never heard of.

  • An mix of songs that include Billy Joel, pop rock from the 60s and early 70s, Elvis, Willie Nelson, Conway Twitty, AC/DC, Juanes, Bon Jovi, CCR, Johnny Cash and Jimmy Buffett.

In case you were wondering, I believe Jason works alone.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/3/2014: For whom does the AMT toll this year? And Lois Lerner: will she or won’t she?

Monday, March 3rd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Laura Saunders, Beware the Stealth Tax; How to minimize the damage of the alternative minimum tax:

…the AMT now applies to eight times as many taxpayers as it did 20 years ago, and common AMT “triggers” often are less esoteric than in the past. “They can be as simple as having three or more children, taking a large capital gain, or—especially—deducting state and local taxes,” says Dave Kautter, managing director at American University’s Kogod Tax Center, who studies the AMT.

20140303-1

That’s pretty much what I see in our practice.  AMT is rare for taxpayers with income under $100,000, and usually occurs in large families.  It can be impossible to avoid AMT in the $200,000 – $500,000 income range, especially in a state with an income tax.  Above $500,000, it typically involves large capital gains.  Both AMT and regular tax have the same 20% tax on capital gains, and the AMT doesn’t let you deduct the related state income taxes, so the AMT will kick in.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Ann Althouse,  Who put “acute political pressure” on Lois Lerner “to crack down on conservative-leaning organizations,” and why did Lerner need a “plan” to avoid “a per se political project”?:

I think it must mean that it was a political project and they were hard at work figuring out how to make it not look like what she knew it was. That’s a smoking gun.

Phony scandal.  Nothing to see here…

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 298

WSJ, No Change: Former IRS Official to Take the Fifth.  “A lawyer for former Internal Revenue Service official Lois Lerner said Sunday that she will decline to testify about IRS targeting of grass-roots conservative groups, contradicting a top GOP lawmaker.”  Presumably because there’s not a smidgen of wrongdoing.

 

TaxProf, Mulligan: ObamaCare’s Multiple Taxes Are Shackling the Job Market.  The TaxProf quotes from the University of Chicago’s Casey Mulligan: 

Once we consider that the new law has an employer penalty, too, the labor market will be receiving three blows from the new law: the implicit employment tax, the employer penalty and the implicit income tax. Regardless of how few economists acknowledge the new employment tax, it should be no surprise when the labor market cannot grow under such conditions.20140106-1

It’s funny how the same people can argue for high tobacco taxes to curb smoking insist that employment taxes won’t curb hiring.

 

Jason Dinesen,  Accounting for the 0.9% Medicare Surtax on Iowa Tax Returns

Kay Bell, Delayed Tax Refunds, TC 570 And An Important Distinction .  Don’t jump to conclusions about your delayed refunds.

William Perez, Resources for Filing Corporate Taxes for 2013.  “March 17th, 2014, is the due date for filing corporate tax returns.”

 Kay Bell, 5 ways to maximize tax-deductible business entertainment

Russ Fox, Former Chairman of Woodland Park, NJ Democratic Committee Bribes His Way to ClubFed

Jack Townsend, IRS CI Is Looking at Renunciations of Citizenship Just in Case .  Looking to take one last shot at the fleeing jaywalkers.

 

Jim Maule, Find Some money, Pay Some Tax:20131017-2

Every now and then we read of someone finding something valuable. This time, it’s a California couple who found a stash of gold coins on their property. According to this story, the couple found eight cans containing 1,400 coins, valued at approximately $10 million.

The joy of the moment is tempered, of course, by the existence of income taxes, both federal and state. Must the couple pay tax? Yes. The value of the coins is included in the couple’s gross income. It is ordinary income. The law is settled. 

Easy come, easy go…

 

Martin Sullivan, The Beginning of the End of Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog):

Enactment of the research credit in 1981 was the antithesis of simplification. It has a highly complex incremental structure and, even more problematic, it assigns tax directors and IRS agents the impossible task of distinguishing research from ordinary business expense. The Camp draft retains the credit and eliminates expensing. The opposite approach would be more sensible.

The research credit study industry is full of former Congressional staffers who like things the way they are.

William McBride, Scott Hodge, Top Line Assessment of Camp’s Tax Reform: Increases Progressivity and Taxes on Business and Investment (Tax Policy Blog):

In general, Camp simplifies and lowers tax rates for many taxpayers and businesses, but does so through a net tax increase on businesses and taxpayers earning over $200,000. As a result, the plan makes the individual tax code even more progressive, it increases the amount of redistribution from high-income taxpayers to other taxpayers, and it worsens the current bias against saving and investment—all of which will be a drag on long-run economic growth.

It looks more and more like the Camp plan was a false move.

William Gale, Dave Camp’s pitch to overhaul U.S. taxes: An impossible dream? (TaxVox)

 

It’s getting real in New Jersey, according to the London Daily Mail online:   ‘Ready to plead guilty’: Teresa and Joe Giudice set to reach plea deal on 41 charges of fraud and tax evasion.  If they were cheating on taxes, becoming national celebrities could have been a bad move.

 

 

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